Grow along with Zipcar

 

Welcome to the Zipcar Garden

Nothing says sustainability like growing your own food, so this year the team at Zipcar UK have decided to dig for victory with our very own Zipcar Garden. Remember the Blue Peter garden? It’s like that, except green and without any badges.

So we found an ideal plot in need of work, hired our very own Zipcar Granny as our resident gardening expert, had a word with the MET office about the weather, and now we’d like you to get involved – either by growing along with us, or by offering up your pearls of horticultural wisdom.


Background:

A few years past we utilised a Zipvan to transport and build a raised vegetable bed in time for the spring and summer seasons. Though small in scale we attempted Onions, Tomatoes, Garlic, Chilli, Potatoes, Lettuce and Peppers. However due to pests, foxes, dogs and over-subscribed barbeque soirées only the Tomatoes and the Lettuce survived:



The old Zipcar Garden plot.

This year, despite questionable weather conditions so far this ‘spring’, the Zipcar Garden returns with even more (blind?) ambition. Over the course of the next few months, with the assistance of Zipvans (and hopefully Zipcar members) we will be building, planting and cultivating large raised beds full of fruit and veg in a concerted effort to ‘grow our own’.

Due to the inclement weather, planting from seed hasn’t been feasible for us so far this year, so we will be using bulbs where we can, available from most garden centres. Planning our beds, we’ve been using the RHS Veg Planner which is invaluable and we’ll be following this for onions, tomatoes, cabbage and broccoli to name a few – it’s time to start getting them in the ground!

The Birds & the Bees:

So before we get properly stuck in with construction (picking up the railway sleepers later this week), there’s a few things you can consider whilst we prepare for the weather to improve – the Birds and the Bees!

Birds offer many great benefits for your garden over and above simply looking pretty (or providing tragically gladiatorial entertainment for domestic cats). A good bird population can aid with pest control, weed control and flower pollination, not to mention the general stress-relief and enjoyment of watching and listening to our little winged friends. They’ve been struggling with the unseasonably cold weather and they need all the help they can get. We sourced some great bird feeders from our local garden centre, but a sprinkling of bird seed or nuts on the ground will suffice provided there are no cats in the vicinity.

Additionally, encouraging bees is another great way to aid pollination, leading to a lively and blooming garden. You can encourage them by planting a selection of colourful native flowers, or by adding a bee house. We’ll be trying to build our own bee and insect house using bamboo canes and wood off-cuts, and we’ll keep you posted on our progress in future posts.

Next time:


The new Zipcar Garden plot, let the construction begin.


In our next post we will update you with the first pictures of the new garden, covering the construction and planting of our beds. Check back soon for an update!
 

Over to you:

In the meantime we’re seeking the advice of any budding horticulturalists within our midst – so please do comment in our comments section below. We’d love to hear your thoughts, advice and tips to help us and our other members as we progress. Or you can send us your photos to ukmarketing@zipcar.co.uk and we’ll post the best examples on here.

 

What will you be growing this year, and what do you recommend?

HTML Comment Box is loading comments...

Gardener's Zipstertime

Granny’s Tip:          


Don’t bother with mulch. It’s expensive, and even if you’ve made your own it will just get tossed around by the birds and the wind, and ultimately is unlikely to stop weeds or make too much of a difference to your soil moisture. Just do a bit of weeding, water your beds and you’ll be fine.”


We’ll be following this advice, but if in doubt click here to read what the RHS say about Mulch.